Video Classics: ‘Do You Feel Like We Do’ – Peter Frampton

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Peter Frampton now lacks the impressive head of hair he had in 1976, but many of us do. (Getty Images/David Paul Morris)

Peter Frampton now lacks the impressive head of hair he had in 1976, but many of us do. (Getty Images/David Paul Morris)

Lest we think that all [lastfm link_type="artist_info"]Helen Reddy[/lastfm] did was make people hear her woman’s roar, you can watch her give none other than [lastfm link_type="artist_info"]Peter Frampton[/lastfm] his intro on Burt Sugarman’s Midnight Special in this clip of Frampton performing “Do You Feel Like We Do” from 1975.

“Do You Feel Like We Do” was originally released on the album Frampton’s Camel, in 1973.  For those wondering, the name simply comes from his the name of his touring band at the time … why they were called that will have to wait for a better-informed person than The Archivist to enlighten us all in the comments. Frampton’s Camel was not only Frampton’s first album recorded in the U.S. (New York, specifically), but also his first album recorded while working within the framework of a group.

After Camel, Frampton began feature “Do You Feel Like We Do” heavily in his live shows. but it is not really that exposure that made the song so well-known. Instead, it was his landmark album Frampton Comes Alive! in 1975.  The album was created based on the strength of his live performances, which producers felt were considerably stronger than his studio outings in many cases. “Do You Feel Like We Do” wasn’t originally intended to be part of Frampton Comes Alive!, but when Jerry Moss at A&M asked “Where’s the rest of it?”, it was decided to make it a double album to more fully capture the feeling of an entire Peter Frampton concert. “Do You Feel Like We Do”, which he often used as a closer, finished off the double album on side four.

It turned out to be a good decision. As one of three singles released from Frampton Comes Alive!, it was edited down to seven minutes, half its length from the album. Still, even as a relatively-lengthy single, the song went to #10 on the Billboard Hot 100.  The success of the double album even netted Frampton an invitation to the White House from President Gerald Ford, who possibly may have been just a bit more hip than history has given him credit for.

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