Forgotten Favorites: The Allman Brothers And “Seven Turns”

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Scott Gries/Getty Images

Scott Gries/Getty Images

Seven Turns was something of a comeback album for the [lastfm link_type="artist_info"]Allman Brothers Band[/lastfm]. It also marked the return of Jaimoe and the arrival of [lastfm link_type="artist_info"]Warren Haynes[/lastfm], who began the first of his two residencies with the ensemble.

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It had been nearly 10 years since the Allman Brothers had released a studio album when they put out Seven Turns in 1990. With Jaimoe returning to the fold, they were back to their classic rhythm section, welcoming Allen Woody aboard to handle the bass parts and Warren Haynes in the mix on lead guitar.

On the strength of this lineup, Seven Turns turned out a trio of songs that hit the rock radio charts. Along with “It Ain’t Over Yet” (which reached #26) and “Good Clean Fun” (which was a #1), there was the #12 charting title track, “Seven Turns.”

Opening with a delicate acoustic riff and a touch of dobro, the Dickey Betts penned track featured the “Ramblin’ Man” himself handling the vocal duties. Jaimoe and Butch sound as comfortable together as they did in ’71 and Warren turns in the kind of class-A slide solo that’s made him a legend.

The soulful call and response of Dickie and Gregg drives the record home, worthy of being called an Allman Brothers classic.


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